Save Us Chuck Woolery

Lin-sanity: The chink in AAJA’s armor

I’ll get to the ridiculous AAJA “media coverage guidelines” on basketball star Jeremy Lin in a moment.

First, some background. I’ve been poking fun of the “Asian American Journalists Association” for more than a decade. The idea of color-coded journalism steeped in identity politics has always grated on my nerves. But no one does a better job of parodying AAJA than AAJA itself. As I reported after a 1999 “Unity of Color” journalist confab co-sponsored by AAJA:

Ignore the smoke screen platitudes about “valuing differences.” Unity demands unanimity. If you don’t accept the left-leaning agenda of advocacy journalism, you’re enabling racism. If you don’t support the pursuit of racial hiring goals as a primary journalistic goal, you’re selling out. If you don’t buy the idea that a first-generation Filipina should feel ethnic solidarity with a fourth-generation Japanese-American simply because they share the same hair and eye color, you’re denying your “identity.”

This pressure to bow and scrape before the false god of skin-deep diversity was overwhelming at two typical workshops I attended.

“Tracking Hatred” was a session on hate crimes and the media. The moderator, reporter Gary Fields of USA Today, gained national attention in 1996 with an extensive series on the purported epidemic of racist church-burnings in the South. After printing a year’s worth of Fields’ fear-inducing pieces claiming an increase in black-church burnings and blaming “a climate of racial hostility,” USA Today debunked the hate-crime conspiracy theory.

So did the president’s National Church Arson Task Force, the New Yorker, the Associated Press, and investigative reporter Mike Fumento, who noted the irony that “no media outlet in the country had done more than USA Today to build the myth in the first place.” Yet, no one at Unity ’99 questioned Fields’ authority.

The session was more of a late-night college gripefest than a professional forum on providing accurate news coverage. One panelist, Brian Levin, railed about critics on the “extreme right” who question the legitimacy of federal hate-crimes legislation. Reporters nodded approvingly. Levin, an activist academic whom Fields frequently quotes, glossed over the constitutional perils of punishing people for their personal biases or political beliefs. Instead of a coherent discussion on case law, participants shared dubious anecdotes.

When one news reporter complained that her editors wouldn’t let her write a story about an alleged hate crime against a personal friend, the panel expressed collective empathy without asking for any of the facts or noting the obvious conflict of interest. The session climaxed with an emotional appeal from Karen Narasaki, an Asian-American activist whose organization peddles an annual hate-crimes audit – which the panelists unanimously praised and distributed to the audience.

The second workshop was titled “How to Arrive, Thrive, and Survive as an Editorial Writer or Columnist.” I served on a panel with writers who were black, Hispanic and Native American. I was not there because the organizers had actually read my work before inviting me. I was there because my brown face – not my dissenting opinions – counted first.

My fellow panelists won hearty applause for ridiculing reverse discrimination and dissing U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Calmly and civilly, I argued against ethnic pigeonholing and expressed my opposition to racial preferences. No cheers here.

…Treating minority journalists as trinkets to be tallied and displayed does not enhance diversity. It fosters cynicism. A newsroom that looks like America is worthless if it doesn’t reflect the diverse and discordant beliefs of its readers. Journalism doesn’t need more like-minded foot soldiers who march in political unity. It needs straight shooters who think fearlessly for themselves.

AAJA has made quite a business for itself mau-mau-ing everyone else to avoid ethnic and racial group-think, while it enforces that same very orthodoxy among its predominantly left-wing, Obama-worshiping membership. “Asian America” is itself a phony ethnic construct tying vastly different generations of immigrants, immigrant children, and grandchildren from across Asia and the Pacific Islands.

Now, the group is milking NBA sensation Jeremy Lin for all he’s worth. After pressuring ESPN to discipline two sports guys who used the phrase “chink in the armor,” the AAJA sensitivity police squad is back with a “handbook to covering Asian America.”

No kidding.

OUR GUIDELINES

Stop to think: Would a similar statement be made about an athlete who is Caucasian, African American or Latino? Use caution when discussing Lin’s physical characteristics, particularly those that feminize/emasculate the Asian male (Cinderella-story angles should not place Lin in a dress). Discussion of genetic differences in athletic ability among races should be avoided. In referring to Lin’s height or vision, be mindful of the context and avoid invoking stereotypes about Asians.

THE FACTS

1. Jeremy Lin is Asian American, not Asian (more specifically, Taiwanese American). It’s an important distinction and one that should be considered before any references to former NBA players such as Yao Ming and Wang Zhizhi, who were Chinese. Lin’s experiences were fundamentally different than people who immigrated to play in the NBA. Lin progressed through the ranks of American basketball from high school to college to the NBA, and to characterize him as a foreigner is both inaccurate and insulting.

3. Journalists don’t assume that African American players identify with NBA players who emigrated from Africa. The same principle applies with Asian Americans. It’s fair to ask Lin whether he looked up to or took pride in the accomplishments of Asian players. He may have. It’s unfair and poor journalism to assume he did.

4. Lin is not the first Asian American to play in the National Basketball Association. Raymond Townsend, who’s of Filipino descent, was a first-round choice of the Golden State Warriors in the 1970s. Rex Walters, who is of Japanese descent, was a first-round draft pick by the New Jersey Nets out of the University of Kansas in 1993 and played seven seasons in the NBA; Walters is now the coach at University of San Francisco. Wat Misaka is believed to have been the first Asian American to play professional basketball in the United States. Misaka, who’s of Japanese descent, appeared in three games for the New York Knicks in the 1947-48 season when the Knicks were part of the Basketball Association of America, which merged with the NBA after the 1948-49 season.

DANGER ZONES
“CHINK”: Pejorative; do not use in a context involving an Asian person on someone who is Asian American. Extreme care is needed if using the well-trod phrase “chink in the armor”; be mindful that the context does not involve Asia, Asians or Asian Americans. (The appearance of this phrase with regard to Lin led AAJA MediaWatch to issue statement to ESPN, which subsequently disciplined its employees.)

DRIVING: This is part of the sport of basketball, but resist the temptation to refer to an “Asian who knows how to drive.”

Both of the ESPN employees that AAJA targeted say they had no intention of offending. One of them is married to a woman of Asian descent. But even as it admonishes others to “be mindful” of “context,” AAJA chooses to ignore the context and intent of the supposed RAAAAAAACISM it decries.

Have their been truly tasteless jokes made about Lin?

No question.

But I contend that the p.c. overreaction and opportunism have been even more vulgar. Jeremy Lin is no victim and he doesn’t need the AAJA herd or anyone else to shield him.

If the Asian American Journalists Association has anyone to blame for the collective impulse to lump people together by race and ethnicity, look no further than the ideological agenda of AAJA itself.

I daresay its sanctimonious selective enforcement of sensitivity standards is the fatal chink in AAJA’s armor.






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Comments

  1. AAJA: Hey, under the skin we’re all the same color, pinko!

  2. Journalism doesn’t need more like-minded foot soldiers who march in political unity. It needs straight shooters who think fearlessly for themselves.

    Obowmao: Objection!

  3. does he speak asian? can he name the capitol of asia? i also forgot to ask, where is the haja, hungarian american journalist association, and are we always hungry, or hungarian? and we expect no food similies, or metaphores about hungarians and food!

  4. If your still hungary go back for samoa.

  5. Sure, I see the slippery slope that putting a slant on the coverage could cause, but seems to me this is akin to yellow journalism in reverse. Well, I’d better zip it up before I get in trouble with the AAJA…

  6. are the samoans plain, or with salt, pepper, and some paprika?

  7. thinderbolt, you better nip it in the bud, uh oh, sorry, my bad, nip? what was i thinking?

  8. Michelle, maybe you should start a new group called “journalists with brains”. Admittedly your pool of possible members would be few in number but I’m sure there are more out there, somewhere, I think, maybe…

  9. It’s been said before: the real racists are the ones who insist on looking at everything through the lens of race.

    I refuse to yield the riches of my language to ignorant, bigoted people who weigh everything by race, or worse, by how they can profit from it.

    When I look at those around me, I see PEOPLE, not ethnicity or race.

    /rant

  10. As a nation we are in deep kim chee. But I am one round eye who will not kow tow to anyone.

  11. Why can the AAJA not air their dirty laudry elsewhere? They continually chop and stick it to all non-asians.

  12. Hey! Kimchee is great stuff. Don’t insult it. (-:

  13. On February 24th, 2012 at 9:21 am, Rogue Cheddar said:

    If you’re still hungary go back for samoa.

    I think I will!

    Samoas are yummy chocolate caramel coconut cookies!

  14. DRIVING: This is part of the sport of basketball, but resist the temptation to refer to an “Asian who knows how to drive.”

    wait… what now?

  15. Have their been truly tasteless jokes made about Lin?

    No question.

    But I contend that the p.c. overreaction and opportunism have been even more vulgar.

    I agree.

  16. Offensive statements about his ethnicity are a firing offense.
    offensive statements about his Christian Faith are actually ENCOURAGED!

  17. …straight shooters who think fearlessly for themselves…

    Our beloved hostess to a “T”!

  18. I agree the AAJA guidelines were an unintentional parody, to the point where they were so stupid it had to be an “Onion” parody. But I agree that commentators and other athletes (Mayweather, anyone?) have treated Lin in a way that can only be described as — I hate to use the word — racist. The attitude seems to be: “How dare this guy come into ‘our’ game and show us all up. Asians might be really good at math but they’re not real athletes like us.” And don’t forget Lin’s faith. Just like all the Tebow haters, these guys are seething over a religious athlete who doesn’t fit their idea of what a basketball player should look and act like. Maybe Lin should cover himself in tatoos, beat up some fans in the stands, talk ugly trash, and/or shoot himself or someone else with a gun?

  19. The idea of color-coded journalism steeped in identity politics has always grated on my nerves.

    I wish to reiterate. I am a Swedish-HYPHEN-American. We are a minority who has suffered brutal Olie & Sven and blonde jokes for far to long. We demand reparations immediately. Send check, cash or money order to:

    swede
    Atlanta GA

    Thank you so much for your mandatory cooperation.

  20. Geez… My Filipina wife is rolling her eyes at that AAJA “handbook.”

    I would not like it at all if my 15 month old son were referred to as an “Asian American” since I agree with Michelle that the term is absolutely ludicrous. He is a native-born citizen of the United States; no further embellishment is needed. (although my in-laws tend to call him “Kano” …)

  21. Another AAJA sneak attack.

  22. On February 24th, 2012 at 9:34 am, old goat said:

    Michelle, maybe you should start a new group called “journalists with brains”. Admittedly your pool of possible members would be few in number but I’m sure there are more out there, somewhere, I think, maybe…

    I think they are called Foxes. They are noted for their brains and their beauty.

  23. max said:
    DRIVING: This is part of the sport of basketball, but resist the temptation to refer to an “Asian who knows how to drive.”

    so can lin drive the lane, or not? and does he take a camera with him everywhere?

  24. On February 24th, 2012 at 10:34 am, peteee said:

    Oh right, Thanks Petee, I had forgotten that sterotype… thanks for keepiong me current AAJA… Now go fasten your seatbelts!

  25. I really wish we had a “like” button for comments here. :)

  26. When I look at those around me, I see dead PEOPLE, not ethnicity or race.

    Mo’ bettah!

  27. ***
    Somehow I don’t think that the AAJA is going to like it when they stumble across one of the old Charlie Chan detective movies either!
    ***
    Aaa Soo! More racists!
    ***
    John Bibb
    ***

  28. On February 24th, 2012 at 9:35 am, Wayfaring Stranger said:

    Hey, Stranger! Nice to hear from you! How have you been?

  29. .
    Cold commentary. There’s rather a nip in the air!

    ==========

    That said … although the history books show that there HAS BEEN some level of anti-asian racism, at least in parts of the country at various times, it has never seemed particularly strong since the end of WWII.

    Is there some? Sure. In a world where some of every group hates some of every other group, how could there not be?

    But I’ve never noticed it as a big influence in our cultural doings.

    And I live in a part of the country where there are a LOT of Americans of asian extraction, and a lot of asian immigrants. By which I mean east Asia and southeast Asia … not Turkey.

    I’ve just never noticed a very strong or widespread aversion among the non-asian types to forming business or personal relations with the asian types.

    Some, yeah. Once in a while. But it’s unusual enough that when it happens you notice.

    The whole AAJA thing has always seemed an academic put up job to me.

  30. I have the same opinion about multi-racial. That is why I think it is wrong to call Obama black. He is bi-racial.

    Hey Roque, see you know a little pidgin.

  31. In all honesty, I had never heard the stereotype of Asians and bad driving. I came to my own conclusions! This is no joke. They really ARE bad drivers! I kept seeing cars change lanes without signal, going too slow, putting on a left blinker and turning right. I always made a point of seeing who was driving. 9 out of 10 times, it was someone Asian. I started kidding about this years ago with my family. If any of us saw a bad driver we always said, probably Asian. We were usually right. So when I heard that this was a common stereotype, I laughed. It is not a stereotype, it is a fact!!

    But hey, we all have our stereotypes. I am a Minnesnowta Norvegian who isn’t too bright, has herring breath, eats only white food, and says “you betcha” all the time. Not true. I only say “you betcha” when I agree with someone.

  32. Up on the hill
    People never stare
    They just don’t care
    Chinese music under banyan trees
    Here at the dude ranch above the sea
    Aja
    When all my dime dancin’ is through
    I run to you

    Up on the hill
    They’ve got time to burn
    There’s no return
    Double helix in the sky tonight
    Throw out the hardware
    Let’s do it right
    Aja
    When all my dime dancin’ is through
    I run to you
    Aja – Steely Dan

    Up on the hill
    They think I’m okay
    Or so they say
    Chinese music always sets me free
    Angular banjoes
    Sound good to me
    Aja
    When all my dime dancin’ is through
    I run to you

  33. Aja – Steely Dan

  34. Woah, that was weird, the Aja – Steely Dan got posted in the middle of the lyrics.

  35. I would not like it at all if my 15 month old son were referred to as an “Asian American” since I agree with Michelle that the term is absolutely ludicrous. He is a native-born citizen of the United States; no further embellishment is needed. (although my in-laws tend to call him “Kano” …)

    My wife is a mix of Chinese and Filipino and grew up in Hawaii. She is American, has no real connection to Asia, but loves the mainland and has no problems with people due to race. She also has no problem with the word – chink. At some time in our past Chink was used against the Chinese railroad workers, but it is so out-of-date, hardly anyone knows where the word even came from.

    But notice, no longer do we see old Charlie Chan movies and no longer do we see any Amos and Andy reruns. We have tried to rewrite history in favor of political correctness.

  36. I kept seeing cars change lanes without signal, going too slow, putting on a left blinker and turning right. I always made a point of seeing who was driving. 9 out of 10 times, it was someone Asian.

    I always see someone on a cell phone.

  37. Thewrd ‘Chink” use din “Chink in the Armor” is a word that disappeared fairly recently from some dialects in Southern England, and comes from Middle English “chine”, meaning crack or flaw. “Chink in the armor” literally means a crack or flaw in the armor, or an exploitable weakness.

    Ditto phrased like “lets nip this in the bud” which has no anti-Japanese sentiment at all.

  38. The AAJA, ” We put the yellow into journalism”.

  39. sanctimonious selective enforcement of sensitivity standards

    This is a perfect example of why I love and envy you Michelle Malkin.

  40. I’m Irish-American once a year when beer and mashed potatoes over hamburger and passed off as “sheperd’s pie” is in the offing, but other than that, I’m just American.

    I feel so cheated, St. Patrick’s Day is always during Lent.

    My church does a fiesta each year in honor of the first Filipino martyr, San Lorenzo Ruiz de Manila. Killed by hanging upside down, by the Japanese. Have never gone, but during the church bazaar each year, I also get the pancit and lumpia plate at the Filipino food booth.

    I’ve never done the other church celebration for our patron saint, St. John Neumann, European born but bishop of Philadelphia.

    The bazaar I do, they sell beer.

  41. On February 24th, 2012 at 11:05 am, Hannibal said:
    The AAJA, ” We put the yellow into journalism”.

    AAJA: Our journalistic ehtics are Spic and Span!

  42. ehtics = ethics (slap!)

  43. Man, Whitey Ford should sue somebody!

  44. That lousy little hyphen will destroy this country. The one and only way to ever move this country forward is to drop it. When someone is from China, Japan, Burma, etc., they’re referred to as “Asian-American”; but yet if someone is from Germany, we don’t refer to them as “Euro-American”. The various countries throughout Asia are as different as night and day. Go to the Philippines and then go to China and see if those cultures aren’t as different as night and day.
    If you’re Mexican and play ball in MLB, you’re still Mexican…not Mexican-American. Until you become naturalized and raise your hand to swear alligence to the US you are still a citizen of your home country.
    I never think of MM as ‘asian-american’. If anything I think of her as the gal who lives in the ‘Peoples Republic of Colorado’….why, I’ll never understand.

  45. Come on AAJA, you’re losing your tempura over nothing.

  46. I’m a mix of German, Welch, Dutch, and English ancestry.
    Therefore, I demand an end to German measles and German chocolate. To the term “Welch on a bet”. To the term “going Dutch”, and to “putting English on a pool ball”.
    Those are racist.

    Now, I gonna continue my Chinese Checkers game.

  47. happyscrapper said:

    In all honesty, I had never heard the stereotype of Asians and bad driving. I came to my own conclusions!

    Spend about 15 minutes driving in Manila, Hong Kong or Bangkok. Case closed. They are N.U.T.S.

  48. On February 24th, 2012 at 9:21 am, Rogue Cheddar said:

    If your still hungary go back for samoa.

    As a 2nd Generation Bohunk I approve this message.

  49. I kept seeing cars change lanes without signal, going too slow, putting on a left blinker and turning right. I always made a point of seeing who was driving. 9 out of 10 times, it was someone Asian.

    February 24th, 2012 at 11:02 am, Mister P said:
    I always see someone on a cell phone.

    Well, that too. Can you imagine an asian woman talking on a cell phone while driving?

    I hope no one was offended by my reference to the Asian driving, but it really has been my experience! Do I think LESS of Asians because they drive bad? Not any more than I get annoyed with Norwegians when they drive bad. There just seems to be more Asians.

    By the way, I am a perfect driver who never makes mistakes. I leave my blinker on all the time so people will be careful around me. I drive 50 MPH in the fast lane to slow everyone else down to a safe speed. And I ALWAYS look carefully before I cut someone off in the next lane!!

  50. where is the haja, hungarian american journalist association

    In the Goulash Archipelago?

  51. On February 24th, 2012 at 10:02 am, ITookTheRedPill said:
    On February 24th, 2012 at 9:21 am, Rogue Cheddar said:

    If you’re still hungary go back for samoa.
    I think I will!

    Take all you want, but Finnish all you take before it gets Chile. I suggest you try the Chad, it’s good Bahrain food. Kenya make sure nobody uses the good China?

  52. Stop to think: Would a similar statement be made about an athlete who is Caucasian, African American or Latino?

    Yes, quite frequently.

    Jeremy Lin is Asian American, not Asian.

    So? Does the fact that he’s not a foreigner mean he doesn’t ”look like” players who came from Asia? (I point this out because, for the last 20 years, whether someone “looks like” someone else or not has been how liberals talk about race.)

    Journalists don’t assume that African American players identify with NBA players who emigrated from Africa. The same principle applies with Asian Americans.

    Not really. As Les Nessman of WKRP radio famously observed, “there are a lot of Negroes in sports.” But there are not a lot of Asian or Asian-Americans for a player of that heritage to identify with.

    The lazy “equivalence” argument doesn’t work here.

    Lin is not the first Asian American to play in the National Basketball Association.

    True, but he’s one of the few whom the rest of us can name. The fact that an Asian-American played 3 games in 1947 (!!) is irrelevant.

  53. The truly shocking part of the whole Lin story – someone from Harvard in the NBA.

  54. It’s very apparent that a lot of folks still haven’t ascribed to the Martin Luther King Jr. philosphy of judging a person by his/her character (or the ability to sink a 3-pointer) rather than the color of his/her skin. Tsk, tsk, tsk.

  55. Take all you want, but Finnish all you take before it gets Chile. I suggest you try the Chad, it’s good Bahrain food. Kenya make sure nobody uses the good China?

    Excellent, RC! Excellent!
    :lol:

    Unfortunately, I couldn’t eat a thing! Too much Greece.

  56. Cue – the – hyphenated – American – rightousness – police – again

    your – pal,
    WASP – Maverick – Throwback -

  57. Geez… My Filipina wife is rolling her eyes at that AAJA “handbook.”

    My wife is a mix of Chinese and Filipino and grew up in Hawaii.

    You people are lying! All conservatives are white redneck racists! All those white people at CNN keep telling me so, so it must be true.

  58. On February 24th, 2012 at 11:04 am, Ed Mahmoud abu al-Kahoul said:
    Thewrd ‘Chink” use din “Chink in the Armor” is a word that disappeared fairly recently from some dialects in Southern England, and comes from Middle English “chine”, meaning crack or flaw. “Chink in the armor” literally means a crack or flaw in the armor, or an exploitable weakness.

    Ditto phrased like “lets nip this in the bud” which has no anti-Japanese sentiment at all.

    Don’t forget about the “niggardly” foolishness that happened to David Howard in 1999.

  59. ***
    HI MR_P–#35. And I seem to remember that the actor playing Charlie Chan was really a White guy. Ditto for most of the role players in the old Amos and Andy radio show.
    ***
    Both shows were pretty funny. Not politically correct–but with some interesting insights into how people think.
    ***
    And for really politically incorrect– and truly funny–All in the Family, The Jeffersons, and Sanford and Son really took the cakes.
    ***
    John Bibb
    ***

  60. Algonquin J. Calhoun: There’s only two reasons a man will do something – money and glory.
    George ‘Kingfish’ Stevens: Hmmmm… Glory.
    Algonquin J. Calhoun: Yeah. Why did George Washington cross the Delaware? Glory! Why did Napoleon go to Waterloo? Glory! And why did I, when I was 12 years old, ride the rapids of the Hudson River on a log when I coulda’ been killed?
    George ‘Kingfish’ Stevens: Glory?
    Algonquin J. Calhoun: Naw… just a fool kid!

  61. “All conservatives are white redneck racists!”

    Thanks AlohaGuy – you’re the one honest conservative.

    You have just gained my respect.

  62. So when do the words “cracker,” “whitey,” or “honky” get banned in reference to any white sports stars?

  63. Ilovegastrointestinaljuices said:

    You have just gained my respect.

    We have always respected your ability to type tedious tripe with only two functioning brain cells. Truly impressive.

  64. Amos: Hey Andy, what you doing’ down dere on the floor?

    Andy: I’s layin’ linolium.

    Amos: Oh, hello dere Linolium baby! Ah didn’t see you down dere!

    Ba dup bup

    Sorry

  65. Ilovemycountry said:

    Thank you for so clearly demonstrating your reading comprehension problem.

  66. We wouldn’t be discussing this disgusting issue if Lin didn’t play for a New York team–and a below .500 team at that–because if he played anywhere else except for maybe Miami or LA, he’d be a footnote. Just as big a problem as the AAJA is the American sports press which never fails to miss an opportunity to over-sensationalize their flavor-of-the-week-or-month because they can’t practice true journalism and just cover the story. I can name a half-dozen players on my own favorite NBA team who are at worst as good as Lin, who were good enough to make the roster against tough competition and thus avoid the D-League, and a few who are way better than Lin or who’ve made just as much of a contribution to their team’s success as he’s made to the Knicks, if not more than, but who get little or no attention from the national media. Let’s see where the homers out east and the AAJA and the rest of the bandwagon jumper-oners are should the league figure out Lin and he starts to fade.

  67. These guys are really excited they have something to do now, aren’t they?
    Meanwhile the world turns.

  68. AlohaGuy said:
    In the Goulash Archipelago?

    not fond of goulash, is there a paprikash archipelago?

  69. LanMandragoran said:
    Don’t forget about the “niggardly” foolishness that happened to David Howard in 1999.

    oh no, you didn’t go there, race card, calling race card!

  70. happyscrapper said: Well, that too. Can you imagine an asian woman talking on a cell phone while driving?

    … driving an SUV, over 50 and wearing glasses.

    I have to admit that whenever possible I profile each and every driver of any vehicle with the potential to kill me on my motorcycle and that one, (among others), justifies making a prophylactic modification to my initially envisioned path of progress to allow extra clearance for potential emergency evasive maneuvering.

    It’s approximately paramount to any teenage girl driving while on a cell phone, but then not quite as bad as the same with the inclusion of other teenage girl passengers in the vehicle laughingly attempting to join in her conversation.

  71. Their screed is like a leftist claiming to be intellectual and smarter than everyone dictating to a 5 year old.

  72. On February 24, 2012 at 07:21 am, Rogue Cheddar said:

    If your still hungary go back for samoa.

    I’m sure there is Turkey left.

    But it was cooked in Greece.

  73. On February 24, 2012 at 08:12 am, The Master said:

    I agree the AAJA guidelines were an unintentional parody, to the point where they were so stupid it had to be an “Onion” parody. But I agree that commentators and other athletes (Mayweather, anyone?) have treated Lin in a way that can only be described as — I hate to use the word — racist. The attitude seems to be: “How dare this guy come into ‘our’ game and show us all up. Asians might be really good at math but they’re not real athletes like us.” And don’t forget Lin’s faith. Just like all the Tebow haters, these guys are seething over a religious athlete who doesn’t fit their idea of what a basketball player should look and act like. Maybe Lin should cover himself in tatoos, beat up some fans in the stands, talk ugly trash, and/or shoot himself or someone else with a gun?

    …along with having a few dozen kids in various cities.

  74. On February 24, 2012 at 08:56 am, happyscrapper said:

    But hey, we all have our stereotypes. I am a Minnesnowta Norvegian who isn’t too bright, has herring breath, eats only white food, and says “you betcha” all the time. Not true. I only say “you betcha” when I agree with someone.

    You betcha herring is good.

    So is pickled Northern!

  75. Maybe Lin should cover himself in tatoos, beat up some fans in the stands, talk ugly trash, and/or shoot himself or someone else with a gun?

    Lin won’t really make it in the NBA until he has ten kids with five different mothers.

  76. Holy mackerel dere Andy! Dis White House is da stucco, and we is the stuckee!

  77. On February 24th, 2012 at 12:55 pm, swede said:
    Holy mackerel dere Andy! Dis White House is da stucco, and we is the stuckee!

    :lol:

  78. Seems the AJAA has never watched Team America.

  79. Michelle, TYPO ALERT!

    “Have their been truly tasteless jokes…”

    Should be:

    “Have there been truly tasteless jokes…”

    Please send my guest editor check to the usual address.

  80. Personally, I think Jeremy Lin suffers from White Man’s Disease.

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